The Chinese government’s massive crackdown on conservative media in China is forcing Breitbart News to publish a censored version of an article that was originally published in May.

The article titled “Chinese government to ban Breitbart News from China” was written by a reporter for a local news site in Guangdong Province, China.

It was published on May 5, one day after the Chinese Communist Party issued a massive crackdown in the country’s southern region of Xinjiang, which has been a hotbed of unrest for years.

In the piece, a man named Yufang stated that his family was forced to sell their home in order to buy a cell phone that was confiscated by the Chinese authorities.

The Chinese authorities in this case are not known to have carried out a single human rights violation, but they have made the lives of journalists and other dissidents in Xinjiang difficult.

The man who wrote the article was quickly detained and later released.

On June 11, the Breitbart News website published a censored article on the same topic by an editor, citing sources that did not agree with the views expressed in the original article.

After the publication of the censored article, the story was pulled from the Breitbart China news feed.

On July 13, the original Breitbart article was published and the censored version was republished with the article’s text changed to make it more readable.

The story has since been removed from the website.

The Breitbart News team has contacted Breitbart News for comment.

Breitbart News has received numerous inquiries about the censorship of the Breitbart article, but has not received a response.

On Friday, the editor of Breitbart China, the local news outlet that published the censored story, sent a tweet to Breitbart News asking for the Breitbart team’s permission to publish the censored Breitbart article.

“The article was written on May 3, the day after Chinese government took over all of Xinjing.

Why is this article censored on our Chinese website?” the tweet stated.

“How do you feel about China’s draconian anti-speech laws?

Do you support China’s government and its crackdown on conservatives in Xinjing?

Do your kids know the rights of journalists?

Can you feel safe in your own home in China?”

The editor then asked for Breitbart News’ permission to share the censored copy of the article with readers.

The editor did not respond to Breitbart’s requests for comment by press time.

Breitbart also sent a statement to the Washington Free Beacon.

“We did not publish the article as published on June 5,” the statement read.

“A Chinese government official, speaking on condition of anonymity, told Breitbart News that the censorship had nothing to do with censorship of Breitbart News.

The official said that the article in question was a response to a complaint filed by a member of the public, and that it had nothing whatsoever to do, as a news organization, with the suppression of freedom of speech in China.”

On Friday morning, the Beijing Times posted a censored Breitbart News story about the same subject.

“An article on May 1 by a Beijing Times reporter is being censored in China.

This is not the first time the BeijingTimes has been censored, and it won’t be the last,” the story stated.

The Beijing Times article stated that “Xinjiang is home to the world’s most persecuted minority, the Uighurs.

“This is also a problem for the Uryghur community in China as they are banned from visiting their own homeland.” “

The article then noted that “Uyghur Uygar has been the subject of repeated crackdowns on their freedom of expression since 2010, with thousands of people being detained and thousands of others fined. “

This is also a problem for the Uryghur community in China as they are banned from visiting their own homeland.”

“Even though there are no official records of the persecution of the Ugyur people, Uyguras rights groups and lawyers are working hard to get the rights restored.” “

“In April, a group of Uyogas lawyers sued Beijing to challenge the ban on their entry, claiming that it was unconstitutional under Chinese constitutional law, and was based on an illegal attempt to punish the Uyer Uyger people by limiting their access to the internet. “

Even though there are no official records of the persecution of the Ugyur people, Uyguras rights groups and lawyers are working hard to get the rights restored.”

The case is still pending, and the lawyers are appealing to the Supreme People’s Procuratorate, the Chinese equivalent of the United Nations.””

After a number of Uyer members, who are also Uyur Uyer, were detained and arrested, the court ordered the authorities to release them.

The case is still pending, and the lawyers are appealing to the Supreme People’s Procuratorate, the Chinese equivalent of the United Nations.”